Saturday, November 20, 2010

NXNS Exclusive! North Minneapolis Property Tax Lawsuit Docs!

Post by the Hawthorne Hawkman, image from the Redfin blog.

EDITORIAL NOTE:  The copy originally posted was missing several pages, most notably the end of Defendant Llangari's claims and the beginning of Defendant Kral's claims.  This was likely due to a scanner pulling two pages through at a time.  The link has been corrected, and the full document is now available.

Ask and you shall receive.  In a previous post, I said I hoped to post the lawsuit documents that claim north Minneapolis properties are being assessed unfairly and therefore taxed at a higher rate than they should be.  Within several hours, I was sent the document I was looking for, along with some other goodies.  The other items and a summary of the complaint are coming soon.  But for anyone who wants to review the lawsuit document...

Click here for a copy.  More will follow.

2 comments:

  1. As much as I'm fascinated by this lawsuit, I have to say I'm surprised that nobody took the college-student purple prose out of the intro. Any decent writer knows that you don't actually SAY "They have suffered unknowingly and the abuse of power must stop." You write something subtle that moves the READER inexorably toward the conclusion that "they have suffered unknowingly and the abuse of power must stop." If the writer says it, it just sounds dumb.

    Proving this case isn't going to be about simple financial valuations or blatant abuse of power. There are too many ways in which the response can be "well, it was a weird time in the market" or "those darn city employees were doing the best they could, they didn't mean to abuse anybody." (The city assessor who is a defendant in the lawsuit are actually pretty nice guys insofar as I've ever dealt with them myself.)

    Rather, this case will depend on Math. In order to succeed in a class action, the plaintiffs will need to use the numbers to demonstrate inequity in the methodology and/or the mindset of the City officials/City employees in the way they a) valued properties and/or b) responded to those who contested the valuations.

    If I wanted to make my mark on this case, I'd be combing the internet for information about how much the city was willing to drop values on properties in various neighborhoods relative to the actual drop in market value in those neighborhoods.

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  2. EDITORIAL NOTE: The copy originally posted was missing several pages, most notably the end of Defendant Llangari's claims and the beginning of Defendant Kral's claims. This was likely due to a scanner pulling two pages through at a time. The link has been corrected, and the full document is now available.

    ReplyDelete